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3 Things Stopping Your Advancement to Operation X

September 14, 2017

"Early leaks of new designs had stirred anticipation for Apple's new smartphone — and on Tuesday Apple delivered on all the predictions with a $699 iPhone 8 and a $999 special-edition iPhone X (as in '10')," writes Alina Selyukh in their recent NPR article entitled "Apple Unveils Three New iPhones, But The Watch Sends Shares Up."

Selyukh continues that "The 10th-anniversary iPhone is the biggest redesign in years, with an all-screen front that eliminates the home button and can use facial recognition to unlock the display."

That's not all either.

According to the NPR article, "CEO Tim Cook says that the Apple Watch has now become 'the No. 1' watch in the world — beating even traditional watchmakers like Rolex."

iPhone X.

No. 1 watch in the world.

Apple doesn't rest on its laurels, does it? Then, why should you?

Question: Do you believe your operation has made its latest iteration to "Operation X?"

If not, what's inhibiting you? We think we know.

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Why It's Time for Proactive Operations to Invest in Research

August 17, 2017

“A big waste of money or the engine of marketplace innovation? That's how some people see basic scientific research. Now a new study shows how basic research and inventions are connected,” according to Joe Palca’s recent All Things Considered podcast on NPR entitled “New Study Highlights Strong Link Between Basic Research And Inventions.”

All Things Considered host, Robert Siegel, explains in the opening comments of the report that “Scientific research can seem abstract or esoteric. But with time, it may turn out to have practical value. A recent study has uncovered a strong link between basic research and inventions that can be brought to the market.”

Palca first asks in the article, “What does the rideshare company Uber have to do with the research of a 19th-century German mathematician named Georg Friedrich Bernhard Riemann?”

He continues that “Benjamin Jones can tell you. Jones is an economist at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management.”

According to Palca, Jones “and a colleague decided to make a more systematic study of how connected basic research was to future patented inventions. They looked at 4.8 million patents issued by the U.S. Patent Office and 32 million scientific papers. They focused on papers that had been cited by at least one other scientist.”

What do you think their findings told them? Would you say that even some basic research could lead to innovation?

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Accountability Problems? Body Hacking Might Be Overkill.

July 27, 2017

“A Wisconsin company is offering to implant tiny radio-frequency chips in its employees – and it says they are lining up for the technology,” according to Merrit Kennedy’s recent NPR article entitled “Wisconsin Company Offers To Implant Chips In Its Employees.”

Kennedy writes that “the idea is a controversial one, confronting issues at the intersection of ethics and technology by essentially turning bodies into bar codes. Three Square Market, also called 32M, says it is the first U.S. company to provide the technology to its employees.”

“The company manufactures self-service ‘micro markets’ for office break rooms. It said in a press release that obtaining a chip is optional, but expects that about 50 employees will take part,” explains the NPR piece.

Kennedy continues, “Employees who have the rice-grain-sized RFID chip implanted between their thumb and forefinger can then use it ‘to make purchases in their break room micro market, open doors, login to computers, use the copy machine,’ 32M said.”

According to the article, “CEO Todd Westby said that the company believes the technology will soon be ubiquitous.”

Here’s the quote from Kennedy’s article:

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3 Questions for the Proactive Leader of Your Property

July 13, 2017

“If Senate Republicans get their way, former Justice Department lawyer Christopher Wray will soon become the next director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation,” explains Carrie Johnson in their recent NPR article entitled “5 Questions For FBI Director Nominee Christopher Wray.”

According to Johnson, “Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, recently told reporters he hopes the nomination will ‘not languish’ and said it's his plan to get Wray confirmed before the August congressional recess.”

“But before any votes take place, Wray will have to face a series of questions about his background — and his backbone,” Johnson shares in the NPR piece.

According to Johnson, the following are the five questions Wray is expected to answer:

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Don't Deviate From Protocol to Get Reliable Results

July 06, 2017

“Science relies on the careful collection and analysis of facts. Science also benefits from human judgment, but that intuition isn't necessarily reliable. A study finds that scientists did a poor job forecasting whether a successful experiment would work on a second try,” writes Richard Harris in their recent NPR article entitled “Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed.”

According to Harris’s article, “That matters, because scientists can waste a lot of time if they read the results from another lab and eagerly chase after bum leads.”

"There are lots of different candidates for drugs you might develop or different for research programs you might want to invest in. What you want is a way to discriminate between those investments that are going to pay off down the road, and those that are just going to fizzle," says Jonathan Kimmelman, an associate professor of biomedical ethics at McGill University in Montreal, in the NPR piece.

“Kimmelman has been studying scientific forecasting for that reason. He realized he had a unique opening when other researchers announced a multi-million dollar project to replicate dozens of high-profile cancer experiments. It's called the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology. Organizers have written down the exact protocols they would be using and promised not to deviate,” Harris continues.

Harris notes in their NPR article, "This was really an extraordinary opportunity,’ according to Kimmelman because so often scientists change their experiment as they go along, so it's hard to know whether a poor forecast was simply because the experiment had changed along the way.”

Now, while you’re not forecasting results of cancer studies, we found a lesson to be learned here.

Do you see it?

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